Look at that Cocoa Go! #tuesdaytreat


willy-wonka-gene-wilderI read something interesting the other day regarding making fuel from chocolate. I’m sure most people have an idea of what  E. coli bacteria is. Our guts are loaded with it. Well, scientists took waste from the chocolate-making process and fed it to E. coli bacteria.  The bacteria fermented the sugars in the waste and generated organic acids ( formic acid). This acid is so toxic to the bacteria, they quickly converted this bi-product to hydrogen.

To what purpose? 

Free energy for one. Hydrogen is one of the cleanest renewable fuels there is. When used, the only byproduct is water. Compare this to poisonous carbon monoxide from gasoline and other fossil fuels. By converting food waste into clean renewable energy instead of garbage for the landfill, food factories and farms would be able use their own waste products to power their manufacturing operations. This waste can also fuel a fleet of hydrogen-powered vehicles. It’s pretty exciting.  th

And guess what today is? It’s Chocolate Day (not to be confuse with National Chocolate Day on October 28th). I think a special day just for chocolate is a perfect reason to have some. You’re welcome.
😀

More~
Facts about Chocolate

A chocolate process from jungle to Hershey Bar

Sadly, chocolate does have a dark side, a very dark side, and I’m not talking about dark chocolate. The industry in Africa has roots deep into child trafficking and modern slavery. Be informed. We have more power to effect change in the world than we realize. Know where your chocolate comes from and exercise your consumer muscle.  Here’s a brands list of fair trade chocolate with no ties to the dark side.
http://www.foodispower.org/chocolate-list/

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100Things!I’m starting a new 100 things today.  This time it’s malapropisms. Dictionary.com defines malapropisms as an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, especially by the confusion of words that are similar in sound.  Here’s one for today:

Michelangelo painted the Sixteenth Chapel.

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RB4U purpleMy 4th of the month blog post is still up on Romance Books ‘4’ Us. I’m talking about the mysterious messages that wash up on beaches in bottles. Very interesting, if I do say so myself. Come see!
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/2015/07/message-in-bottle-by-rose-anderson.html

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RB4U purpleToday is guest Author Karen McCullough
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Romance Books ‘4’ Us
The Christmas in July contest is on! We have $100 in gift cards for Amazon/B&N. Other prizes can include ebooks, print books, audiobooks, more gift cards and non-book items.
http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

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Attention Authors~ My Exquisite Quills blog hosts six fun and b1e43-eqpicfree promo opportunities a week. I’m delighted to say it’s a hot spot with great exposure. Come join in!
http://exquisitequills.blogspot.com/

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Love Waits in Unexpected Places –
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories by Rose Anderson

Download your free chapter sampler today!

Find my novels in ebook and paperback on Amazon and Barnes & Noble
and wherever romance books are sold.

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About ~RoseAnderson

Rose Anderson is an award-winning author and dilettante who loves great conversation and delights in discovering interesting things to weave into stories. Rose also writes under the pen name Madeline Archer.
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2 Responses to Look at that Cocoa Go! #tuesdaytreat

  1. treknray says:

    I visited the Bacardi Rum Factory in Puerto Rico a few years ago. One of the things they were most proud of was the use of bacteria to make electricity for use in the plant.

    • Having been to Kentucky distilleries, I can imagine the heavy burnt sugar scent on the air. I wonder if they were making hydrogen in Puerto Rico. Can you imagine a process that not only fuels the machines we use, but has water as a bi-product? I have no idea if that amount of water is significant, I’m guessing it’s released as steam. But if that process could be rigged to condense steam back into water like a distillery, then that opens all sorts of possibilities. Hard hit areas of drought could sure use something like that for farming.

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