The A to Z Challenge – N for Nebra, Sky Disk


The A to Z Challenge is on! Hello and welcome to my Main blog. My name is Rose Anderson and I’m a romance novelist. Join me and more than 2279 bloggers and authors as we blog the alphabet throughout the month of April. My daily posts will be mostly history with some science topics here and there. I’ve chosen subjects that tickle my fancy, I hope you will find them interesting too.

Keep the topic rolling! If you have comments or questions, add them at the end of the post. I may not know the answer off the top of my head but I love research and would enjoy discussing my topics further. Comments can be made just below my bio in the tag section.

*FREE* If you enjoy reading scorching romances with unique twists and characters full of personality and depth, scroll down for a free chapter sampler. Find my book trailers in the tabs above.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞


Today’s Calliope’s Writing Tablet post is brought to you by the letter N ~
N for Nebra Sky Disk

People have lived in Europe a long time. Modern humans only hit the scene around 40,000+ years ago. They eventually absorbed those heavy-boned cousins on our family tree — the early peoples called Neanderthals (named for the Neander valley in Germany where their bones were first discovered). Such stone age peoples have lived across Europe for 300,000 years or longer. Like I said, a long time.

In that lengthy inhabitation early peoples left evidence behind. Sometimes this evidence is small like fire-baked rock from their hearths or stone chips from their tool making. Some things are grander, such as Lascaux and Chauvet Caves, and Stonehenge, Newgrange, Carnac, and other monolithic structures. Others come later like the Roman baths, aqueducts, and Hadrian’s Wall for example. Some things are stumbled upon like the body of English King Richard III, viking swords, and caches of Roman coins. These historical treasures, large and small, have value to mankind for they show us our past. Museums and universities buy them, study them, and put them safely on display that we might know ourselves. Sadly, there are unscrupulous collectors of artifacts and antiquities who, by the very nature of their wants and desires, have created a market for poachers, plunderers, potters, and grave robbers. Archeological sites around the world are destroyed and looted, their goods sold on the black market.

Today’s post begins just that way.

In 1999, two previously-convicted looters were out sweeping the forests of Germany with metal detectors. Just outside the town of Nebra they found a prehistoric enclosure on top of a hill. In it lay an unusual circular object along with a cache of bronze axes and swords. In their zeal to dig them out of the cache, the artifacts were damaged. These men tried to sell their loot on the international market in hopes of snagging the highest payout. Fortunately, German law considers relics state property. The looters were caught in a sting operation in Switzerland when an archaeologist posed as a private collector.

The site in the forest underwent legitimate inventory and is considered one of the most significant and exciting archaeological sites in Europe. What did they find? A 3,600 year-old sky disc — the oldest visual representation of the cosmos known to date. This complex astronomical clock from the Bronze Age is now called the Sky Disc of Nebra, and it just happened to be found near the Goseck Circle, Europe’s oldest observatory.

Here’s how it reads:

NebraCalibrationI can’t possibly explain the story better than these BBC broadcasts and the links that follow. Let’s just say wow.

Part 1

Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAyUpT9nhLQ
Part 3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My_DMV5jMnk

More~
The early Bronze Age explained at the German State Museum

Is it legit? Science tests the metal.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjWGkgQcq_o
Very interesting
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2004/stardisctrans.shtml

Other interpretations
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6722953.stm

In 2013, Germany submitted the Nebra Sky Disk for inclusion in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register .

Tomorrow ~ letter O

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Authors_in_Bloom-300x250Last day for wild foods recipes on my satellite blog!
Visit all the participants and win prizes too.
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

The Authors in Bloom event highlights those things authors do outside the fiction. We garden, we cook, we craft etc. One of the more unusual things my husband and I have done was lead wild foods programs for Chicago’s Field Museum. For this event I’ll be sharing my recipes. Do stop by. You may have delicious ingredients waiting in your backyard!

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

trrbanner

 

Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The A to Z Challenge – M for Medicine Shows & Mountebanks


The A to Z Challenge is on! Hello and welcome to my Main blog. My name is Rose Anderson and I’m a romance novelist. Join me and more than 2279 bloggers and authors as we blog the alphabet throughout the month of April. My daily posts will be mostly history with some science topics here and there. I’ve chosen subjects that tickle my fancy, I hope you will find them interesting too.

Keep the topic rolling! If you have comments or questions, add them at the end of the post. I may not know the answer off the top of my head but I love research and would enjoy discussing my topics further. Comments can be made just below my bio in the tag section.

*FREE* If you enjoy reading scorching romances with unique twists and characters full of personality and depth, scroll down for a free chapter sampler. Find my book trailers in the tabs above.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞


Today’s Calliope’s Writing Tablet post is brought to you by the letter M ~
M for Medicine Shows and Mountebanks

I got into a conversation with my husband and daughter the other day. They both watched a recent release of the series Mad Men. I’ve never watched the show, but it’s my understanding it’s about the world of advertising in the middle of the last century. Apparently psychology played a large role in getting people to buy products after the war.  We talked about advertising on the scale it is today. I think advertising always contained hype and a bit of fact-bending.  As per the habit of the writer’s mind, I wandered with the topic and ended up on a friend of mine.  He historically portrays a composite character from an old-time traveling medicine show who “sells” tonics to a a gullible crowd. And so I discarded the topic I’d chosen for M and started anew.

To examine American Traveling Medicine Shows one needs to begin with the mountebanks of Europe. In case you don’t know, a mountebank is a purveyor of quack medicines. In other words a charlatan or a fraud. Mountebanks came into their own in the Middle Ages where they peddled tokens to protect one from the recurring runs of plagues and devils — the usual stuff. During the Renaissance the mountebanks dazzled their crowds with street theater that often include feats of magic, amazing skills and illusions, music, or staged miracles. The idea was to draw them in, then sell to them!

By the 1700′s, the mountebanks were pitching their spiel and selling worthless products to a budding nation. The quackery got so bad in North America that the colonies tried to put an end to them early on. Several colonies successfully passed Acts through their local governing bodies regulating these home made medicines, while other colonies passed Acts for outright suppression of mountebanks.

But in much the same way today’s http://www.legendsofamerica.com/photos-americanhistory/medicineshow.jpgadvertisements influence with subliminal sexual gratification, the promises the mountebanks made on behalf of their products were siren’s calls to the gullible or afflicted, and consumers flocked like sheep to buy them.

There was more at play than promises.

I’ll begin with the shills — those who came into town ahead of the mountebanks and pretended they were in some sorry condition. To gull the crowd, they’d buy the magical elixirs, drink them down on the spot, toss down their crutches and be miraculously “cured”. You can bet a special bottle was set aside just for them. The traveling medicine shows curried legitimacy with costumed characters pretending to belong to the mysterious cultures of the Orient.  The Hindu snake handlers, medicineshowposter-275Egyptian belly dancers, sheiks, fakirs and more brought a worldliness to rural America. If it was good enough for the Sheik’s back ache, then it was good enough for old Tom the barber. That extra marketing charisma was an irresistible carrot dangling on a stick.

Home remedies at the time often followed the ancient belief in the doctrine of signatures . That is, if a leaf is shaped like a liver then it must treat the liver. Snakes, for example, slithered effortlessly on their healthy spine, therefore snake oil must be good for rheumatism. Often real medicines and tinctures tasted bitter so medicine show tonics had bitter ingredients added to lend a bit of authenticity. Cocaine and opium were common additives, as were turpentine, creosote, stump water, and bitters. Mostly, they contained alcohol. In some states were Blue Laws were on the books, you couldn’t buy spirits on the weekends, but you could buy that tonic that kicked like a mule.

Inventing problems the tonics and elixirs are alleged to solve.

In their mesmerizing sales pitches, some pretty posteroutrageous promises were made. Eliminating baldness and being irresistible to the fairer sex were the benign claims. Curing tuberculosis, diphtheria, venereal diseases, infant colic and digestive problems, female complaints of all sorts, and even as a cure for cancer, were all found in this one bottle and it only cost you a few pennies… and a little blind faith. Bottles were purchased and business was good. Before you knew it the medicine show had gone. Speed was important lest someone become ill or drunk, as they often did. Children, the elderly, and the infirm were dosed. Often with tragic consequences.

On the flip side, some common old-timey patent medicines actually became household products with a genuine following for their efficacy. I remember some oldies were still on the drug store shelves when I was a kid. We know them today as Fletcher’s Castoria, Ex-Lax, Absorbine Jr., Doan’s Pills, Geritol, Bromo-Seltzer, Carter’s Little Pills, Vick’s VapoRub, Smith Brothers Throat Drops, Philips’ Milk of Magnesia, and who doesn’t know Bayer Aspirin and Anacin?

After centuries of charlatanism, the Pure Food and Drug Act was enacted in 1906 requiring manufacturers to list their ingredients on labels and restrict misleading advertising claims. In 1938, safety testing came into being. In 1962, effectiveness testing was required. And so, the snake oil and the snake oil salesman left the scene. But if you look closely, you’ll see they’re still out there making up the ads and commercials that bombard our lives each day.

More~

Here’s a good friend of mine playing his alter ego — a colonial mountebank.
Fun to Note: Towards the end he makes music with two sets of bones. He taught me to play. I’m nowhere near that good. :)

Here’s a later example of the medicine show quack. He does a very good job as a slick talker. Imagine him with his cart in 1870′s rural Iowa or Oklahoma and the purses emptying to buy his elixirs.

More From the Oklahoma Historical Society

Fast Fact: In their book Freakonomics, authors Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner point their finger at Listerine as the source of today’s shame-based selling. I say shame-based because we once lived in a haze of child-like innocence unaware of the abject offensiveness of split-ends, graying hair, sweaty underarms, stained teeth, dandruff, ring around the collar, bad breath and more. Fortunately, the makers of Listerine clued us in at the turn of the last century. And it grew more outrageous as time went on. Even Lysol was sold as a douche. Seriously.

Tomorrow ~ letter N

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Authors_in_Bloom-300x250Last Week for wild foods recipes on my satellite blog!
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

The Authors in Bloom event highlights those things authors do outside the fiction. We garden, we cook, we craft etc. One of the more unusual things my husband and I have done was lead wild foods programs for Chicago’s Field Museum. For this event I’ll be sharing my recipes. Do stop by. You may have delicious ingredients waiting in your backyard!

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

trrbanner

 

Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The A to Z Challenge – L for London Fog of 1952


The A to Z Challenge is on! Hello and welcome to my Main blog. My name is Rose Anderson and I’m a romance novelist. Join me and more than 2279 bloggers and authors as we blog the alphabet throughout the month of April. My daily posts will be mostly history with some science topics here and there. I’ve chosen subjects that tickle my fancy, I hope you will find them interesting too.

Keep the topic rolling! If you have comments or questions, add them at the end of the post. I may not know the answer off the top of my head but I love research and would enjoy discussing my topics further. Comments can be made just below my bio in the tag section.

*FREE* If you enjoy reading scorching romances with unique twists and characters full of personality and depth, scroll down for a free chapter sampler. Find my book trailers in the tabs above.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞


Today’s Calliope’s Writing Tablet post is brought to you by the letter L ~
L for London Fog of 1952

As a child visiting relatives in San Fransisco in the 1960′s, I remember watching the fog roll in off the ocean. It was exciting for this Midwestern girl  to see such an awe-inspiring thing.  As if the ocean wasn’t amazing on its own. The fog came rolling in like a cloud wall until you could only see a few feet in front of you. That’s basically what fog is — a ground cloud. It’s my understanding that the atmospheric conditions concocting a heavy fog only requires a 4° difference between air temperature and dew point. Air cooled to the dewpoint can no longer hold all of the water vapor it contains. Water droplets condense, and that makes fog. Were these ground clouds in the cold upper sky instead, we might have rain. Weather creates extraordinary phenomena.

The weather conditions that came into play over the UK in December back in 1952 created a fog of another kind — a killer fog.

Smoke + fog = smog

Earliest Roman accounts mention the fogginess of Britain. Islands often have heavy mists and fogs.  They’re called advection fog — air that’s been warmed over land meets the cold surface of the ocean. As Britain is surrounded by sea, so common are fogs to this island, the fogs even have names. Along the Northumbrian coast the fog is called the fret.  In the southeaster portion of Scotland it’s the haar.

With much of the land deforested in its long inhabitation, the populace turned to peat and coal to cook with and warm their hearths. This put soot into the foggy air. So heavy and persistent the smoggy fog of 1807, Charles Dickens wrote it into his novel Bleak House. A popular name for the fog during that time was the London particular. In 1813, a fog “smelling of coal tar” was so unrelenting, the prince regent on his outing had to turn his carriage around and go home.

Not just a bad smell

The economic recovery came slow during the post-war reconstruction and money was tight. Around 1952 London had just given up its electric buses for cheaper diesel.  At the time, the nation’s high-grade cleaner-burning coal was exported and Londoners were left to burn a lesser-grade high-sulfur coal to heat their homes. From here I’ll paint you a picture…

The cold fog rolled in December 4th and Londoners paid it little mind. As mentioned above, fogs and mists were a regular feature in their lives. An early cold snap saw coal-fired plants and houses cranking up the heat. As midday approached, the fog mixed with thousands of tons of soot in the air and soon took on a yellowish cast. Little did anyone realize this fog wouldn’t be clearing anytime soon. A temperature inversion had formed 1000 feet above the city and acted like a dome that trapped the noxious air inside. But it was cold and the factories and homes continued to burn their cheap coal. Before long a 30-mile wide blanket of sulfurous carbon monoxide stink enveloped London. 

For four days the entire city was immobilized by this toxic fog. River traffic stopped as did all transportation outside of the London Underground. At one point, men walked with lanterns ahead of the buses for a time to keep traffic moving, but that too stopped cold. Schools closed. Movie theaters closed because patrons couldn’t see the screens. Accounts in some parts of the city say people couldn’t see their hand before their eyes nor their feet as they walked. Worse, death had come.

A black oily soot smudged faces and every corner of London. Several prize heifers died at the famous Sheffield Show. In desperation, farmers took to rigging makeshift gas masks for their animals.  People too were beginning to perish. Initial estimates put the death toll at 4000, mainly those with respiratory problems, infants, and the elderly. On December london-smog9th, a cold wind blew the the smog out to sea. The after-effects lingered and the death toll rose to approximately 12,000. 

Unbelievably, change came slow. Though an investigation determined they had a serious pollution problem, the government didn’t want to change things at first. It took nearly four years for Parliament to pass the Clean Air Act of 1956 that restricted coal burning in urban areas. Transitioning from coal to gas, oil, and electricity  took years and during that time other deadly fogs would come. The killer fog of1962 claimed 750 lives. 

 

 ~More~
They had an idea something was wrong before the tragedy of 1952.

Here’s another clip

 More images

An extra 2⊄: Mankind is certainly a short-sighted creature. In my portion of the world we have politicians determined to repeal the Clean Air Act. As an environmentalist, this infuriates me because it’s all profit motivated. Yes, money talks. It always has. But what good is money if breathing, a process so necessary to life, becomes impossible? One need only look at China where air pollution is choking the populace even as I write this. We’d all better make some changes soon.

“Water and air, the two essential fluids on which all life depends,
have become global garbage cans.”
~ Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Tomorrow ~ letter M

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Authors_in_Bloom-300x250Last Week for wild foods recipes on my satellite blog!
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

The Authors in Bloom event highlights those things authors do outside the fiction. We garden, we cook, we craft etc. One of the more unusual things my husband and I have done was lead wild foods programs for Chicago’s Field Museum. For this event I’ll be sharing my recipes. Do stop by. You may have delicious ingredients waiting in your backyard!

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

trrbanner

 

Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Funday Sunday, weekend happenings & the last word


The A to Z returns Monday with letter L. Today is Funday!

No, that’s not a typo.smile :D

I lead a busy life. To have one less mentally-busy day and still have a good time on this blog, I’ve decided Sundays will be all about wonder and smiles. In honor of mentally kicking back once in a while, Sundays will be Fun Days! Each Sunday, I’ll post a short, fun or unusual something here. I’m a nerd with a complex sense of humor and absurd wit. It literally could be anything.

April is mathematics month. In honor of that let’s celebrate
a surprising digit — the number nine.  I find it interesting!

:D

Come back tomorrow for more of the A to Z Challenge. Monday’s letter ~ L.

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6bd34-bee1What’s up Saturday & Sunday?

I’m posting offerings on my satellite blogs this weekend. If two things are listed for one blog, that’s one on Saturday and one on Sunday. Scroll back to see what you’ve missed.

Authors in Bloom
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

Seductive Studs & Sirens
& Weekend Writing Warriors
http://theancillarymuse.blogspot.com/

Sneak Peek Sunday
http://ifollowthemuse.blogspot.com/

Saturday’s After Dark Moments & Sexy Snippets
http://calliopesotherwritingtablet.blogspot.com/

The Sunday Preview – Promo opportunity for romance authors.
Stop by my group blog and leave your preview!
http://exquisitequills.blogspot.com/

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Today I post the last word in the 100 Things Blogging Challenge!002xbqkt
For 100 days,
I’ve posted something from my chosen topic: Words on the Verge of Extinction.
:D

Gardevisure (noun 1610-1840)
~visor of a helmet as shown on heraldic devices

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4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

trrbanner

Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The A to Z Challenge – K for Kokopelli


The A to Z Challenge is on! Hello and welcome to my Main blog. My name is Rose Anderson and I’m a romance novelist. Join me and more than 2279 bloggers and authors as we blog the alphabet throughout the month of April. My daily posts will be mostly history with some science topics here and there. I’ve chosen subjects that tickle my fancy, I hope you will find them interesting too.

Keep the topic rolling! If you have comments or questions, add them at the end of the post. I may not know the answer off the top of my head but I love research and would enjoy discussing my topics further. Comments can be made just below my bio in the tag section.

*FREE* If you enjoy reading scorching romances with unique twists and characters full of personality and depth, scroll down for a free chapter sampler. Find my book trailers in the tabs above.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞


Today’s Calliope’s Writing Tablet post is brought to you by the letter K ~
K for Kokopelli

I’ve said before that I am a drummer. My husband and friends gather regularly to make music together. Besides a variety of drums, we have all sorts of  percussion instruments and unusual rhythm makers from all over the world. Sometimes we make music indoors, other times we drum and dance in the moonlight. As we have the largest yard to accommodate such a gathering, we host full moon drummings at my house. That includes the notable Blue Moon — those extra moons in the year. More times than not we entrain when we really get going — that is, our brains synchronize. Some future post I’ll explain the science behind that. One of the strange things about entrainment is the ability to all stop together without any lead up to let you know the music is winding down. It also leaves you feeling rather high to have your brainwaves mingling with other brainwaves.  Gotta love science.  :D
It was after such a brain bonding on a full moon night that I saw something on the moon.

People often see things on the moon, images like the rabbit, the man in the moon, the sitting woman. Depending what image your culture says is there, that’s what you’ll see, just as we see things in cloud formations. This flight of fancy is called pareidolia. There’s a science in this too. Humans are hard-wired to look for faces. I suspect it has to do with bonding as in baby and mother bonding. But I digress. Back to the moon…

So on that wild drumming night the moon was huge and bright, so bright in fact that at 2:30 in the morning you could hear birds making little chirping sounds as they tried to determine if dawn had come early. I looked at that moon and saw him. It wasn’t the rabbit, the woman or the man in the moon face. It was Kokopelli. I was seized with an overwhelming case of surety that told me that sometime in the past, an aboriginal storyteller in North America looked up and saw the dancing flute player.

Ive scoured the web looking for a comparable moon to show here and gave up after so many pages of images. Online images  don’t show a clear Kokopelli. This is a rough attempt to show what I saw. It takes skill to draw with a computer’s mouse and that’s a skill I just don’t possess.

20110319-full-moon-622koko

Who is Kokopelli?

It’s said Kokopelli is a Kachina, a spirit being in the pantheon of Southwest Native American deities known for music, dance, and mischief. The ancient Anasazi considered him a god but his origins are thought to be older still. Ancient rock carvings and paintings, a.k.a. petroglyphs, date him at 3,000 or so years.

Depending on which peoples you ask, the humpbacked dancing flute player has different meanings attributed to him. Generally, this kachina is thought to carry a sack on his back like a traveler or trader. In legends, the sack carries everything from unborn babies to seeds to other gifts. His flute is said to be a nose flute (yes there really are such things). The melody on his flute would bring rain, melt snow, and the change the seasons.

In keeping with those babies on his back, he’s also associated with replenishment and fertility. Some of the petroglyphs show him dancing with a substantial erection. Legend says when Kokopelli played his flute everyone would sing and dance all through the night. Come morning every maiden in the village would be with child. There have been no such surprises for my drummer friends.

Here’s an example of the nose flute

My son gave me his head cold for my birthday last week. Needless to say, I’m writing this through a brain fog. Sorry for the late post.
Tomorrow it’s Funday Sunday and on Monday ~ letter L!

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Authors_in_Bloom-300x250**NEW THIS WEEK** on my satellite blog!
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

It’s Day6 in the Authors in Bloom event. It highlights those things authors do outside the fiction. We garden, we cook, we craft etc. One of the more unusual things my husband and I have done was lead wild foods programs for Chicago’s Field Museum. For this event I’ll be sharing my recipes. Do stop by. You may have delicious ingredients waiting in your backyard!

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

It’s the final stretch in the 100 Things Blogging Challenge!
For nearly 100 days, 002xbqkt
I’ve posted from my chosen topic: Words on the Verge of Extinction. Just 1 entry to come!

Here’s one for today:

Essomenic (adjective 1771)
~showing things as they will be in the future

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4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

trrbanner

 

Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

The A to Z Challenge – J for Jug Band


The A to Z Challenge is on! Hello and welcome to my main blog. My name is Rose Anderson and I’m a romance novelist. Join me and more than 2279 bloggers and authors as we blog the alphabet throughout the month of April. My daily posts will be mostly history with some science topics here and there. I’ve chosen subjects that tickle my fancy, I hope you will find them interesting too.

Keep the topic rolling! If you have comments or questions, add them at the end of the post. I may not know the answer off the top of my head but I love research and would enjoy discussing my topics further. Comments can be made just below my bio in the tag section.

*FREE* If you enjoy reading scorching romances with unique twists and characters full of personality and depth, scroll down for a free chapter sampler. Find my book trailers in the tabs above.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞


Today’s Calliope’s Writing Tablet post is brought to you by the letter J ~
J for Jug Band

I heard  a story recently about how an abundance of empty whiskey jugs from the bourbon-fragrant streets of Louisville Kentucky led to an American music form — jug band. I don’t know if that’s true or not, but it’s a cute story.

The musical pastiche of jug band was at its root a poor man’s pastime. You didn’t need money when love of music and sheer joy played tunes on anything one could wrangle a tune out of.  As a world drummer who finds music latent in all sorts of things, I understand this. I play a few odd instruments myself — spoons and bones, and a washboard with thimbles. I’ve even played tabletops, glass bottles, and the occasional iron gate! Needless to say, jug band intrigues me.  :D 

Instruments were mostly home made: washboards and scraping thimbles kept time. Mouths blowing into empty jugs produced tuba sounds. Washtubs or gut-buckets played bass while cigar-box or gourd-bottom fiddles, bowed saws, spoons, and paper-on-comb kazoos played melody. If you were lucky, a neighbor might join in with a real guitar, banjo, or harmonica. Jug band music was popular in the old vaudeville days between 1880 and the 1930′s, and often appeared in traveling medicine shows, on riverboats, and in southern honky-tonks.

I think one of the coolest things about this improvised music style was how it influenced other music such as Jazz, the Blues and eventually Rock. Examine it further and you’ll see American skiffle and that musical style eventually influenced the Beatles. Skiffle, by the way, was “rent party” music. Gathering musicians together and charging a few cents to hear them allowed you to make your rent payment — a popular idea in the 1920′s. I know a young couple who do that today, quite successfully too.

So many music greats started in jug band. Bands like Jimmy Bertrand’s Washboard Wizards, Clarence Williams’ Seven Gallon Jug Band and Washboard Five, The Mound City Blue Blowers, Ma Rainey’s Tub-jug Band, and many more, gave a start to several music legends. Greats like Louis Armstrong, King Oliver, Jimmy Dorsey, Gene Krupa, and Glen Miller all cut their musical teeth here.

The USA and Great Britain saw a Jug band revival in the 1950′s.

Few people know the effect of jug band on the music we grew up on. The Even Dozen Jug Band had musicians John Sebastion and Steve Katz. John Sebastion went on to form The Lovin’ Spoonful and Steve Katz joined Blood Sweat and Tears. Zal Yanovsky of The Lovin’ Spoonful got his start in The Mugwamps Jug Band as did Cass Elliot and Denny Dougherty who later formed The Mommas and the Papas. Gerry Garcia from Mother McCree’s Jug Champions went on to form the Grateful Dead. My favorite, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, had John McEuen and is still pickn’ and grinnin’. 

In the UK, the Midnight Special Skiffle Band had Van Morrison who was also in the Sputniks Skiffle Band. The Kingston’s Bucktown Skiffle Group had Mick Jagger. Singer Cliff Richards sang in the Dick Teague Skiffle Group. A whole slew of folk musicians played Skiffle and so did Rock musicians like Roger Daltrey, Jimmy Page, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. Graham Nash and Allan Clarke of The Hollies were all in lesser Skiffle bands. Ringo Star also played in the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group around the same time John Lennon was forming The Quarrymen Skiffle Band with Paul McCartney and George Harrison which eventually became the Beatles. From here on is a post for another day…

More~

http://www.jugband.org/

Here’s an interesting trailer for a documentary called Chasin’ Gus’ Ghost about Gus Cannon and the impact of jug band on other music.

My washboard needs some spiffing up!

David Holt can teach you to play some unusual instruments, and youtube is filled with his videos. I could spend all day watching him. I once saw him play a bag of potato chips. Now that’s improvisation.

I had such a hard time choosing the visuals for today’s post. There are so many terrific examples online. If you want to smile, look up the Yokohama Jug-Band Festival on youtube.

Tomorrow ~ letter K!

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Authors_in_Bloom-300x250**NEW THIS WEEK** on my satellite blog!
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

It’s Day5 in the Authors in Bloom event. It highlights those things authors do outside the fiction. We garden, we cook, we craft etc. One of the more unusual things my husband and I have done was lead wild foods programs for Chicago’s Field Museum. For this event I’ll be sharing my recipes. Do stop by. You may have delicious ingredients waiting in your backyard!

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It’s the final stretch in the 100 Things Blogging Challenge!
For nearly 100 days, 002xbqkt
I’ve posted from my chosen topic: Words on the Verge of Extinction. There are 2 entries to come.

Here’s one for today:

Ectylotic (adjective 1736-1864)
removing warts or calluses

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4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

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Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The A to Z Challenge – I for Iceman


The A to Z Challenge is on! Hello and welcome to my Main blog. My name is Rose Anderson and I’m a romance novelist. Join me and more than 2279 bloggers and authors as we blog the alphabet throughout the month of April. My daily posts will be mostly history with some science topics here and there. I’ve chosen subjects that tickle my fancy, I hope you will find them interesting too.

Keep the topic rolling! If you have comments or questions, add them at the end of the post. I may not know the answer off the top of my head but I love research and would enjoy discussing my topics further. Comments can be made just below my bio in the tag section.

*FREE* If you enjoy reading scorching romances with unique twists and characters full of personality and depth, scroll down for a free chapter sampler. Find my book trailers in the tabs above.

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Today’s Calliope’s Writing Tablet post is brought to you by the letter I ~
I for iceman

Sometime in the mid-1990′s my husband and I went to a public presentation at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (a.k.a. Fermilab). Before CERN, Fermilab’s accelerator was the place to be for experiments on particle physics. (I did say I was a nerd) Researchers from around the world work there and to keep everyone happy and entertained in the off hours, they have guest speakers and concerts.  This particular guest speaker was talking about something extraordinary. Climate change melting the 20-mile thick ancient ice off portions of the Alps had uncovered a prehistoric man who’d been buried in glacial ice for millennia. And he had his prehistoric clothing and tools with him!

OetzitheIceman-glacier-199109b[1]It all started when a pair of hikers walked the Alpine Italian-Austrian border that geographically divides the Alps and got more than an outing when they stumbled upon the mummified body of an ancient man in an exposed gully bed. At first the pair didn’t know what to think. Was this a missing hiker? Ice bodies do turn up from time to time. The snowy Alps can be a rough place.  Even Napoleon’s frozen soldiers turn up on occasion. When authorities were called on the scene, they knew they had something different. Recent ice bodies, those lost in the last several years or so, go through this weird process where fat from inside the body somehow ends up on the outside. This body was freeze-dried.  It didn’t have that typical lumpy coating of fat found on more recent ice bodies. Sure enough, they discovered this guy was old. 5,300 years-old, in fact. He came from the late Neolithic or early Chalcolithic period (Copper Age). 

Nicknamed Ötzi, he would become the most otzithoroughly studied mummy ever found. Through intense scrutiny, scientists have pieced together an astoundingly complete view of this man’s world and his final hours in it. The image shown here was built upon physical data collected by CT scans.

Here’s a brief idea of what they’ve learned since I first heard about him back in the 1990′s.

  1. Ötzi was a progressive. Rather than a life of a hunter gatherer common at this time, his clothing made of domestic animals skins reflect he was shepherd who tended cows and sheep.
  2. He was a pastoralist. His woven grass cape and moss-packed hide boots suggests he slept out with his flock. His tools suggest a crafty man who could make whatever he needed on the spot.
  3. Ötzi had Lyme Disease, whipworms, and arthritic knees. He stood 5’3″ tall and weighed approximately 110 pounds. He was in his 40′s and also had tattoos. Originally artists had given Ötzi blue eyes. His DNA says brown.
  4. His last meal had been cultivated wheat (possibly bread), deer and ibex meat, and plums. It also suggests he wasn’t far from home when he died. Scientists also found an herb called hop hornbeam in the undigested mix. It’s known for treating upset stomachs. He was lactose intolerant.
  5. Though he may have fathered children, his DNA reflects his mother’s line is now extinct. He does have distant relatives, however. 19 men alive today share a paternal ancestor.
  6. He was murdered by an arrow in the back. His head wound and a severe hand wound when coupled with the fact the stone arrowheads in his pouch have the blood of four different people on them, all suggest he’d been in a rather savage fight over a period of three to eight days. Perhaps he retreated to the mountains after and was followed. The fact his stomach was full shows he had time to eat well. It also suggests his death was a result of a surprise attack. Someone pulled the arrow shaft from his back, leaving the arrowhead inside. Was it his murderer? That remains a mystery.

~More~

Here’s a hands-on take on Ötzi’s world

http://www.icemanphotoscan.eu

/http://www.iceman.it/en


Tomorrow ~ letter J!

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Authors_in_Bloom-300x250**NEW THIS WEEK** on my satellite blog!
http://calliopeswritingtablet.blogspot.com/

It’s Day4 in the Authors in Bloom event. It highlights those things authors do outside the fiction. We garden, we cook, we craft etc. One of the more unusual things my husband and I have done was lead wild foods programs for Chicago’s Field Museum. For this event I’ll be sharing my recipes. Do stop by. You may have delicious ingredients waiting in your backyard!

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

It’s the final stretch in the 100 Things Blogging Challenge!
For nearly 100 days, 002xbqkt
I’ve posted from my chosen topic: Words on the Verge of Extinction. There are 3 entries to come.

Here’s one for today:

Tragematopolist (noun 1656-1658)
~confectioner; seller of sweets

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4 Us iconSee what’s happening on the RB4U blog today
http://romancebooks4us.blogspot.com/

Our April contest is on. We’ll have 3 winners and a lot of prizes to split among them. http://www.romancebooks4us.com/

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Love Waits in Unexpected Places -
Scorching Samplings of Unusual Love Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/333971
Download your copy of my free chapter sampler!all7books-small

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

trrbanner

 

Posted in Past Posts - you'll never know what you'll find | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments